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English

English and English Literature

English Curriculum Vision:

  • Every pupil has a right to be inspired and interested in the fantastic literature available to them. There is a rich variety of literature in the world and this knowledge should be communicated to pupils.  Literature is a reflection of a society’s development of thought and expression, and is a fundamental part of our culture.
  • Every pupil has the right to develop their skills of self-expression, both in terms of accuracy and creativity.  Self-expression is a basic human right, and is enshrined in our laws and culture.
  • Every pupil can become a critical reader, understanding a variety of texts, and able make inferences. Language is a key part of a society’s culture and again part of who we are.
  • Every pupil has the right to excellent focused study that means they can achieve their full potential. Education and qualifications are key to ensuring pupils have choices and access to the next level of their personal development.

English Curriculum Intent:

  • Our curriculum is knowledge based. We seek to expose pupils to high quality texts of significant literary weight. We introduce them to ideas and concepts that are new, to texts that they may not ordinarily choose to read outside the classroom, and to ensure that all pupils have a solid foundation and grounding in classics from the English literary canon.

    The texts that we study from Year 7 onwards are intended to provide a solid basis for study at GCSE and beyond. For success in English Language units, we use a variety of established literary texts to teach the skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.

Curriculum Offer

Key Stage 3

Unit

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

1 (8 weeks)

Origins of Literature

An introduction to the literary timeline, exploring archetypal characters throughout time, with an overview of Classic and Greek mythology. The students will learn about the origin and evolution of literature, the roles within literature alongside a historic timeline of pivotal literary texts.

History of Rhetoric 

 

Pupils will consider the origin and role of rhetoric throughout literature and non-fiction, developing a thorough understanding of the impact of language choice and how these are used to manipulate audiences. This unit builds upon students’ understanding of the literary timeline, providing an insight into the power and command of language through intertextuality.

Gender and Power Through the Ages

Pupils will consider the evolution of how gender and power are represented within fiction and non-fiction. Students will also explore of the use of language, writing about this through a critical lens.

2 (8 weeks)

Romeo and Juliet

This unit provides an introduction to Shakespeare, his language and form along with the conventions of tragedy. The students will read key scenes, with lessons on acting out key sequences, focus on significant themes in the play whilst developing an understanding of characterisation, setting and context.

The Tempest

This unit develops students’ understanding of Shakespeare’s craft. They will read key scenes with a focus on staging. As well as writing about themes, students will also analyse characterisation and setting. Pupils will continue to experience Shakespeare’s language whilst learning to evaluate the complex and ambiguous character of Prospero.

Identity Poetry Anthology

Pupils will be taught to make perceptive, sustained links between the poems and identify a range of poetic devices. Students will analyse language, different poetic forms and will explore the writer’s intention.

3 (8 weeks)

The Romantics and Rebellion Poetry

Pupils should have a thorough understanding of Romanticism through a selection of poetry and literature. Pupils will develop an understanding of different poetic forms and writers’ themes and attitudes and learn to make links and comparisons between poems.

Gothic Literature

The students will explore gothic literature, in line with a consideration of the origins of gothic art, moving towards the uncertainty of the Industrial Revolution. With this, the pupils will explore the development of tension, suspense and oppression, along with a consideration of writers’ methods including setting, character and narrator in order to produce their own creative writing.

The Merchant of Venice

Students will develop and consolidate skills in reading Shakespeare. There will be an extensive discussion of key themes and wider issues of the text e.g. justice, prejudice and anti-Semitism.

4 (8 weeks)

A Christmas Carol

The students will read the entire novel with a focus on character, significance of events, awareness of a writer at work and their choices Dickens makes. The pupils will be introduced to the Victorian era and will analyse how a character changes.

The students will be introduced to planning and preparing a discursive essay whilst considering they key morals and messages of the text.

Lord of the Flies

The students will read the entire novel with a focus on character, wider themes and meanings and the presentation of characters. Pupils will critically analyse the idea of human experience and the impact of chaos and disorder through a literary lens. Students will develop an understanding of allegory and learn to chart the change in a character.

Of Mice and Men

Students will read the entire novel. They will focus on the presentation of themes and how they link a text together. Pupils will learn to deal with an extract and to closely analyse the text.  Students will explore themes such as: racism, gender roles, equality and justice. 

 

5 (7 weeks)

Detective Stories

The students will read three Sherlock Holmes story as stimuli for their own creative writing. Pupils will develop an understanding of crime within the Victorian era and will analyse Holmes’ methods. The students will look at narrative structure, genre, character building, narrator and voice, tension and setting in order to know excellent creative writing looks like before applying it to their own.

War Poetry

The pupils will make links between war poems with a focus on reading skills, analysis of language, wider themes, writers’ attitudes and different poetic forms. By looking at a variety of war poems – World War One, modern warfare, The Boer War – students will learn of the contextual implications the narrators/poets faced and will make connections between poems.

Journey’s End

Students will consider wider issues within a text, building upon knowledge of the war and the impact of such an event to inform literature as a historical tool.  The students will also explore the craft of the playwright.

Key Stage 4

Students study the AQA Specification for English Language and English Literature at GCSE level, taking four exams in total at the end of Year 11.

GCSE English Language

English Language Paper 1 is called ‘Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing’ and accounts for 50% of the Language GCSE. English Language Paper 2 is called ‘Writers Viewpoints and Perspectives’ and is worth 50% of the overall GCSE. The Non-examined assessment in Spoken Language is a separate, compulsory endorsement that is marked by teachers. More information can be found on the AQA GCSEA English Language website:

AQA GCSE English Language

GCSE English Literature

Students are studying AQA Option B Modern Texts. Paper 1 is worth 49% of students' overall GCSE grade. Students are assessed on their knowledge of Shakespeare's 'Macbeth' and 'An Inspector Calls' by J.B. Priestley. English Literature Paper 2 assesses the students' knowledge of the AQA Power and Conflict Poetry Anthology and their skills in analysing and comparing Unseen Poetry. More information can be found on the AQA GCSE English Literature website:

AQA English Literature

 

Key Stage 5

A Level English Literature

Our Literature students follow the AQA A Specification and study a broad range of prose, poetry and drama texts linked by two main themes: love and war. Students read texts in their entirety, studying the context of production and reception and read widely around them.  The core texts we currently study are:

  • ‘Rebecca’ written by Daphne Du Maurier
  • Anthology of Love Poetry through the Ages: Pre-1900
  • ‘Othello’ by William Shakespeare
  • ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ by Oscar Wilde
  • Poetry of Wilfred Owen
  • ‘Regeneration’ written by Pat Barker
  • ‘My Boy Jack’ written by David Haig
  • Literature Non-Examined Unit

 

More information can be found on the AQA English Literature website:

AQA AS and A level English Literature

 

A Level English Language

Our linguists follow the OCR specification, exploring the key constituents of the English Language and how it has developed and continues to change over time. Students engage with a range of non-fiction, fiction and multimedia texts and apply linguistic frameworks to analyse and interpret language considering contexts of production, reception and theoretical approaches.

Units covered include:

  • Language Under the Microscope
  • Writing about a Topical Language issue
  • Dimensions of Linguistic Variation
  • Child Language Acquisition
  • Language in the Media (covering Gender, Power and Technology)
  • Language Change    
  • Language Investigation and Academic Poster (Non-Examined Unit)

More information can be found on the OCR English Language website:

OCR AS and A level English Language

Media and Film

The media play a central role in contemporary society and culture. They shape our perceptions of the world through the representations, viewpoints and messages they offer. The media have real relevance and importance in our lives today, providing us with ways to communicate, with forms of cultural expression and the ability to participate in key aspects of society. The economic importance of the media is also unquestionable. The media industries employ large numbers of people worldwide and operate as commercial industries on a global scale. The global nature of the contemporary media, coupled with ongoing technological developments and more opportunities to interact with the media, suggest that their centrality in contemporary life can only increase.

Film is an important part of many people's lives. Those who choose to study it characteristically bring with them a huge enthusiasm and excitement for film which constantly motivates them in their studies. They experience a powerful medium that inspires a range of responses from the emotional to the reflective as they are drawn into characters, their narratives and the issues films raise. The root of that power is the immersive audio-visual experience film offers – one that can exploit striking cinematography, composition and locations as well as powerful music and sound. It is not surprising that many consider film to be the major art form of the last hundred years and that many feel it important to study a medium that has such a significant influence on the way people think and feel.

KS4 Media

Examinations and ‘Non-exam assessment’ (formerly known as coursework):

Component 1: Exploring the Media

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

40% of qualification

Section A: Exploring Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following print media forms: magazines, marketing (film posters), newspapers, or print advertisements. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to one set product (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one two-part question assessing representation in relation to one set product and one unseen resource in the same media form. Part (a) is based on media contexts. Part (b) requires comparison through an extended response.

Section B: Exploring Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms: film, newspapers, radio, video games. It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Understanding Media Forms and Products

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

30% of qualification

This component assesses all areas of the theoretical framework and contexts of the media in relation to television and music.

Section A: Television

  • one question on either media language or representation, which will be based on an extract from one of the set television programme episodes to be viewed in the examination (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one question on media industries, audiences or media contexts.

Section B: Music (music videos and online media)

  • one question on either media language or representation (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one question on media industries, audiences or media contexts.

Component 3: Creating Media Products

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual media production for an intended audience in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of media language and representation.

AS Media

Component 1: Investigating the Media

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. It consists of two sections.

Section A: Investigating Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following media forms: advertising, marketing, music video or newspapers. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to an unseen audio-visual or print resource
  • one extended response comparison question assessing representation in one set product and an unseen audio-visual or print resource in relation to media contexts.

Section B: Investigating Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms – advertising, marketing, film, newspapers, radio, video games - and media contexts.

It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Investigating Media Forms and Products

Written examination: 2 hours

35% of qualification

This examination assesses knowledge and understanding of media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. The exam consists of three sections.

Section A – Television

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section B – Magazines

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section C – Online Media

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Component 3: Media Production

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual media production comprising a single media product created in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework.

A Level Media

Component 1: Media Products, Industries and Audiences

Written examination: 2 hours 15 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. It consists of two sections:

Section A: Analysing Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following media forms: advertising, marketing, music video or newspapers. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to an unseen audio-visual or print resource
  • one extended response comparison question assessing representation in one set product and an unseen audio-visual or print resource in relation to media contexts.

Section B: Understanding Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms – advertising, marketing, film, newspapers, radio, video games - and media contexts.

It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Media Forms and Products in Depth

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media

contexts. It consists of three sections:

Section A – Television in the Global Age

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section B – Magazines: Mainstream and Alternative Media

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section C – Media in the Online Age

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Component 3: Cross-Media Production

Non exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual cross-media production based on two forms in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework and digital convergence.

KS4 Film

Examinations and ‘Non-exam assessment’ (formerly known as coursework):

Component 1: Key Developments in US Film

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

35% of qualification

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of three US films chosen from a range of options.

Assessment consists of four questions on one pair of US mainstream films and one

US independent film:

Section A: US film comparative study - Rebel without a Cause (Ray, USA, 1955), PG and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (Hughes, USA, 1986), 12A

  • one stepped question on the first of the chosen pair of films (produced between 1930 and 1960)
  • one stepped question on the second of the chosen pair of films (produced between 1961 and 1990)
  • one question requiring a comparison of the chosen pair of films

Section B: Key developments in film and film technology

  • one multi-part question on developments in film and film technology

Section C: US independent film - Whiplash (Chazelle, USA, 2014), 15

  • one question on one US independent film.

Component 2: Global Film: Narrative, Representation and Film Style

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

35% of qualification

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of three global films

produced outside the US chosen from a range of options.

Assessment consists of three questions in three sections:

  • Section A: one stepped question on one global English language film (District 9 (Blomkamp, South Africa, 2009), 15)
  • Section B: one stepped question on one global non-English language film (Tsotsi (Hood, South Africa, 2005), 15)
  • Section C: one stepped question on one contemporary UK film (Skyfall (Mendes, UK, 2012), 12)

Component 3: Production

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

This component assesses the ability to apply knowledge and understanding of film to

a production and its accompanying evaluative analysis. Learners produce:

  • one genre-based film extract (either from a film or from a screenplay)
  • one evaluative analysis of the production, where learners analyse and evaluate their production in relation to comparable, professionally-produced films or screenplays.
Future Careers

The study of English, Media, and Film can lead to a variety of careers. Although none of the subjects are vocational, they are ideal preparation for careers that require candidates to be analytical, creative thinkers who can express themselves well in both oral and written communications.

Anyone with an English degree or qualification will tell you that picking this subject can lead to a lot sceptical questions: “What are you going to do after school?” or “What kind of a job can you really get with an English qualification?”

The brilliant thing about English is its flexibility and how transferable the skills are—you’re not confined to a specific vocational track. Instead, the skills you learn can be applied to many different industries—from business, education, government, and research, to publishing, entertainment, media, and communication.

English, Media and Fim will teach you to write well, organize ideas in a logical way, and create strong arguments, with sharp analytical thinking, creativity, and excellent research skills.

These are all vital for any career in:

  • Journalism
  • Teaching (Primary, Secondary, EAL, SEN)
  • Advertising
  • Library Studies
  • Publishing copy-editing
  • Arts administration
  • Film/TV
  • Marketing
  • PR
  • Social media management