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English

English and English Literature

The Vision

  • Every pupil has a right to be inspired and interested in the fantastic literature available to them. There is a rich variety of literature in the world and this is communicated to pupils.Literature is a reflection of a society’s development of thought and expression, and is a fundamental part of who we are as a culture.
  • Every pupil has the right to develop their skills of self-expression, both in terms of accuracy and creativity.Self-expression is a basic human right, and is enshrined in our laws and culture.
  • Every pupil can become a critical reader, understanding a variety of texts, and able to read between the lines. Language is a key part of a society’s culture and again part of who we are.
  • Every pupil has the right to excellent focused study that means they can achieve to beyond their full potential. Education and qualifications are key to ensuring pupils have choices and access to the next level of their personal development.
Curriculum Offer

Key Stage 3

At KS3, we see it as vital that pupils are exposed to a rich variety and breadth of literature to develop their skills and experience as both readers and writers. All three years at KS3 follow the same pattern, with text choices changing as the years go on.

 

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Creative Writing and Short Stories

Detective Genre – Sherlock Holmes

Gothic genre – Edgar Allen Poe

Writing based on experience- variety of short stories.

Novel

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.

 

Lord Of the Flies by William Golding.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck.

Shakespeare

 

Romeo and Juliet

The Tempest

Merchant of Venice

Media

The News.

Advertising.

19th and 21st Century Non-fiction

Poetry

 

An Anthology on poems around rebellion and dissent. 

 

An anthology of poems from the Romantic era.

An anthology of poems based around the theme of identity.

Drama

 

Our Day Out by Willy Russel

Coram Boy adapted from the novel by Jamila Gavin

Journey’s End by RC Sherriff

Key Stage 4

Although we are currently working towards the GCSE offered by Eduqas, from Sept 2018, pupils will be entered for the GCSE offered by AQA.

Pupils will complete a GCSE in English Language and a GCSE in English Literature. All pupils will complete a Speaking and Listening assessment which is awarded in addition to the GCSE in English Language.

GCSE English Language

  • Responding to 20th Century fiction
  • Responding to 19th and 21st Century non-fiction texts
  • Writing creatively
  • Transactional writing.

GCSE English Literature

  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • Power and Conflict poetry
  • Responding to an unseen poem
  • An Inspector Calls  by JB Priestly
  • The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by R L Stevenson.

Key Stage 5

At KS5, we currently offer A Level English Literature and A Level English Literature.

A Level English Literature

Units will cover a range of pre 20th century literature texts and modern texts. Choice of texts is limited, but will centre around teacher and student research interests. Current texts studied are:

  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
  • Poems of the Decade Collection
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

A Level English Language

This A Level is an exploration of the English Language and how it has developed and changed over time.

Units covered include:

  • Language under the microscope
  • Writing about a topical Language issue
  • Dimensions of Linguistic Variation
  • Child Language Acquisition
  • Language in the Media
  • Language Change    
Media and Film

The media play a central role in contemporary society and culture. They shape our perceptions of the world through the representations, viewpoints and messages they offer. The media have real relevance and importance in our lives today, providing us with ways to communicate, with forms of cultural expression and the ability to participate in key aspects of society. The economic importance of the media is also unquestionable. The media industries employ large numbers of people worldwide and operate as commercial industries on a global scale. The global nature of the contemporary media, coupled with ongoing technological developments and more opportunities to interact with the media, suggest that their centrality in contemporary life can only increase.

Film is an important part of many people's lives. Those who choose to study it characteristically bring with them a huge enthusiasm and excitement for film which constantly motivates them in their studies. They experience a powerful medium that inspires a range of responses from the emotional to the reflective as they are drawn into characters, their narratives and the issues films raise. The root of that power is the immersive audio-visual experience film offers – one that can exploit striking cinematography, composition and locations as well as powerful music and sound. It is not surprising that many consider film to be the major art form of the last hundred years and that many feel it important to study a medium that has such a significant influence on the way people think and feel.

KS4 Media

Examinations and ‘Non-exam assessment’ (formerly known as coursework):

Component 1: Exploring the Media

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

40% of qualification

Section A: Exploring Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following print media forms: magazines, marketing (film posters), newspapers, or print advertisements. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to one set product (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one two-part question assessing representation in relation to one set product and one unseen resource in the same media form. Part (a) is based on media contexts. Part (b) requires comparison through an extended response.

Section B: Exploring Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms: film, newspapers, radio, video games. It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Understanding Media Forms and Products

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

30% of qualification

This component assesses all areas of the theoretical framework and contexts of the media in relation to television and music.

Section A: Television

  • one question on either media language or representation, which will be based on an extract from one of the set television programme episodes to be viewed in the examination (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one question on media industries, audiences or media contexts.

Section B: Music (music videos and online media)

  • one question on either media language or representation (reference to relevant contexts may be required)
  • one question on media industries, audiences or media contexts.

Component 3: Creating Media Products

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual media production for an intended audience in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of media language and representation.

AS Media

Component 1: Investigating the Media

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. It consists of two sections.

Section A: Investigating Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following media forms: advertising, marketing, music video or newspapers. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to an unseen audio-visual or print resource
  • one extended response comparison question assessing representation in one set product and an unseen audio-visual or print resource in relation to media contexts.

Section B: Investigating Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms – advertising, marketing, film, newspapers, radio, video games - and media contexts.

It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Investigating Media Forms and Products

Written examination: 2 hours

35% of qualification

This examination assesses knowledge and understanding of media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. The exam consists of three sections.

Section A – Television

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section B – Magazines

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section C – Online Media

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Component 3: Media Production

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual media production comprising a single media product created in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework.

A Level Media

Component 1: Media Products, Industries and Audiences

Written examination: 2 hours 15 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media contexts. It consists of two sections:

Section A: Analysing Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following media forms: advertising, marketing, music video or newspapers. There are two questions in this section:

  • one question assessing media language in relation to an unseen audio-visual or print resource
  • one extended response comparison question assessing representation in one set product and an unseen audio-visual or print resource in relation to media contexts.

Section B: Understanding Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms – advertising, marketing, film, newspapers, radio, video games - and media contexts.

It includes:

  • one stepped question on media industries
  • one stepped question on audiences.

Component 2: Media Forms and Products in Depth

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes

35% of qualification

The examination assesses media language, representation, media industries, audiences and media

contexts. It consists of three sections:

Section A – Television in the Global Age

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section B – Magazines: Mainstream and Alternative Media

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Section C – Media in the Online Age

There will be one two-part question or one extended response question.

Component 3: Cross-Media Production

Non exam assessment

30% of qualification

An individual cross-media production based on two forms in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework and digital convergence.

KS4 Film

Examinations and ‘Non-exam assessment’ (formerly known as coursework):

Component 1: Key Developments in US Film

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

35% of qualification

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of three US films chosen from a range of options.

Assessment consists of four questions on one pair of US mainstream films and one

US independent film:

Section A: US film comparative study - Rebel without a Cause (Ray, USA, 1955), PG and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (Hughes, USA, 1986), 12A

  • one stepped question on the first of the chosen pair of films (produced between 1930 and 1960)
  • one stepped question on the second of the chosen pair of films (produced between 1961 and 1990)
  • one question requiring a comparison of the chosen pair of films

Section B: Key developments in film and film technology

  • one multi-part question on developments in film and film technology

Section C: US independent film - Whiplash (Chazelle, USA, 2014), 15

  • one question on one US independent film.

Component 2: Global Film: Narrative, Representation and Film Style

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

35% of qualification

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of three global films

produced outside the US chosen from a range of options.

Assessment consists of three questions in three sections:

  • Section A: one stepped question on one global English language film (District 9 (Blomkamp, South Africa, 2009), 15)
  • Section B: one stepped question on one global non-English language film (Tsotsi (Hood, South Africa, 2005), 15)
  • Section C: one stepped question on one contemporary UK film (Skyfall (Mendes, UK, 2012), 12)

Component 3: Production

Non-exam assessment

30% of qualification

This component assesses the ability to apply knowledge and understanding of film to

a production and its accompanying evaluative analysis. Learners produce:

  • one genre-based film extract (either from a film or from a screenplay)
  • one evaluative analysis of the production, where learners analyse and evaluate their production in relation to comparable, professionally-produced films or screenplays.
Future Careers

The study of English, Media, and Film can lead to a variety of careers. Although none of the subjects are vocational, they are ideal preparation for careers that require candidates to be analytical, creative thinkers who can express themselves well in both oral and written communications.

Anyone with an English degree or qualification will tell you that picking this subject can lead to a lot sceptical questions: “What are you going to do after school?” or “What kind of a job can you really get with an English qualification?”

The brilliant thing about English is its flexibility and how transferable the skills are—you’re not confined to a specific vocational track. Instead, the skills you learn can be applied to many different industries—from business, education, government, and research, to publishing, entertainment, media, and communication.

English, Media and Fim will teach you to write well, organize ideas in a logical way, and create strong arguments, with sharp analytical thinking, creativity, and excellent research skills.

These are all vital for any career in:

  • Journalism
  • Teaching (Primary, Secondary, EAL, SEN)
  • Advertising
  • Library Studies
  • Publishing copy-editing
  • Arts administration
  • Film/TV
  • Marketing
  • PR
  • Social media management